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More Corrections the the DPI’s yrcurnt Election Timing Variable: OECD Edition

Previously on The Political Methodologist, I posted updates to the Database of Political Institutions' election timing variable: yrcurnt. That set of corrections was only for the current 28 EU member states.

I’ve now expanded the corrections to include most other OECD countries.1 Again, there were many missing elections:

Change list

Country Changes
Australia Corrects missing 1998 election year.
Canada Corrects missing 2000, 2006, 2008, 2011 election years.
Iceland Corrects missing 2009 election year.
Ireland Corrects missing 2011 election.
Japan Corrects missing 2005 and 2012 elections. Corrects misclassification of the 2003 and 2009 elections, which were originally erroneously labeled as being in 2004 and 2008, respectively.

 Import into R

To import the most recent corrected version of the data into R simply use:

election_time <- rio::import('')

  1. Australia, Canada, Iceland, Israel, Japan, South Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Switzerland, USA


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